Lots of tweets about carbs and dee
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anarchistettin: afunnyfeminist: whatareyoureallyafraidof:   Far...

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anarchistettin:

afunnyfeminist:

whatareyoureallyafraidof:

  Far too many people have short memories when it comes to the shit their side did.

White supremacists and police have never been asked to commit to nonviolence. That’s only ever been asked of victims.

That’s only ever been asked of victims.

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jaimeshade
11 days ago
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Atlanta, GA
rocketo
11 days ago
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seattle, wa
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1 public comment
toddgrotenhuis
9 days ago
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Earlier comment is true, but the latter is bullshit. They get asked to commit to nonviolence all the time. It just doesn't get serious response.
Indianapolis

Banh mi-focused Mr. Saigon replaces University Market on 12th Ave

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Mr. Saigon, geared toward providing Capitol Hill with convenient, quality, and affordable Vietnamese cuisine, is slated to replace a longtime quick mart on 12th Ave.

The restaurant, the Mr. Saigon group’s first venture, is planned to debut May 14th in the former home of University Market. Mr. Saigon is a creation of Huy Tat the owner behind Jackson’s scratch banh mi provider Lan Hue.

The new Mr. Saigon will boast a menu of seven sandwiches, offering four traditionally favorite sandwiches, along with a rotating menu offering three creative banh mi iterations.

Individual sandwiches will be nine inches long, “packed with homemade ingredients,” and can be paired with fresh rolls, coffee, and pastries in $9 combos.

The company says Mr. Saigon prioritizes freshness and authenticity and much as they emphasize convenience, believing these qualities all sustain one another. According to a representative from the Mr. Saigon group, “Other Vietnamese restaurants serve $10 individual Vietnamese sandwiches, and we feel like that is expensive,” the rep tells CHS. “We understand why the price is that high, as other places get their ingredients elsewhere, but we make the bread, spread, and cold cuts in house, helping us give the customer more value.”

Taking a page from a sandwich giant, Mr. Saigon also plans to guarantee freshness when you simply walk in the door. “We bake the bread in front of you. When you come in, you see the freshness,” the rep said.

Along with “seeing freshness,” future Mr. Saigon customers will be greeted with a view of a large flat screen displaying the specials geared toward Seattle University students.

Mr. Saigon also has long-term goals of expansion beyond 12th Ave as the group aims to provide cheap, fresh, Vietnamese sandwiches to “anywhere there is a decent amount of foot traffic willing to give us an opportunity.”

Mr. Saigon will open at 734 12th Ave. You can learn more at mrsaigonbanhmi.com.


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jaimeshade
18 days ago
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@ beb
Atlanta, GA
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What The Hell Is Going On With The Homo For The Holidays Crew?!?!?

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Cast of Homo for the Holidays in "happier" times. Photo: JiJi LeeJesus, Mary and Joseph Fiennes!!!! It’s an appropriate blasphemy when it’s applied to the ongoing drama involving the cast and producers of the beloved and long running annual Xmas holiday show, HOMO FOR THE HOLIDAYS, staged at Oddfellows Hall on Capitol Hill for the last 32,378 years. The show, which includes a Jesus character in …
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jaimeshade
24 days ago
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Atlanta, GA
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Don't Know What Palantir Is? You Need To.

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by Eli Sanders

Peter Thiel, founder of Palantir, endorsing Donald Trump at the 2016 Republican National Convention.
Peter Thiel, founder of Palantir, endorsing Donald Trump at the 2016 Republican National Convention. Alex Wong / Getty Images

If you watched Mark Zuckerberg's appearance before Congress earlier this month, you might have heard Washington State Senator Maria Cantwell questioning the Facebook CEO about his awareness of a company called Palantir.

Cantwell's first question to Zuckerberg was: "Do you know who Palantir is?

"I do," replied Zuckerberg.

He should, since the founder of Palantir, Peter Thiel, sits on the board of Facebook.

But if you would have answered Cantwell's question in the negative, then you need to read this recent Bloomberg investigation into what Thiel's Palantir does.

For the right price, Palantir helps government agencies, major corporations, and local police departments map out who knows who, and how.

This was helpful to JPMorgan Chase & Co's efforts to essentially spy on its employees (until that spying became an internal scandal). It's been helpful to U.S. military forces fighting the Iraq insurgency. And it's become a go-to tool for law enforcement, with innocent people sometimes becoming victims along the way (simply because their online data seemed to implicate them).

Palantir's software, Bloomberg reports, "combs through disparate data sources—financial documents, airline reservations, cellphone records, social media postings—and searches for connections that human analysts might miss. It then presents the linkages in colorful, easy-to-interpret graphics that look like spider webs."

Basically, it does what Cambridge Analytica did with all that wrongfully shared Facebook data that had members of Congress grilling Zuckerberg for two days. It tries to create an intricate portrait of your actions and desires using the online trail you've left, and then it uses that portrait to help its clients.

While Palantir's primary clients appear to be banks, governments, and police departments, it looks like the Trump campaign and Cambridge Analytica somehow got some Palantir-style help before the last presidential election.

"In March," Bloomberg reports, "a former computer engineer for Cambridge Analytica, the political consulting firm that worked for Donald Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign, testified in the British Parliament that a Palantir employee had helped Cambridge Analytica use the personal data of up to 87 million Facebook users to develop psychographic profiles of individual voters." (Palantir told Bloomberg the employee was doing this work on his own time.)

What to do?

Well, one way to rein in all these misuses of your online data would be to have an American version of the European Union's General Data Protection Regulation.

When she was questioning Zuckerberg, Cantwell asked: "Do you believe the European regulations should be applied here in the US?"

"Senator," Zuckerberg replied, "I think everyone in the world deserves good privacy protection."

And Thiel?

Well, back in 2011, according to Bloomberg, he argued that "civil libertarians ought to embrace Palantir, because data mining is less repressive than the 'crazy abuses and draconian policies' proposed after Sept. 11."

That's quite a choice: intrusive data mining or a police state.

But, also, Thiel's not really that into the whole American experiment anyway.

"I no longer believe that freedom and democracy are compatible," Thiel wrote in a 2009 essay.

In the world of Thiel's Palantir, we're all just "people and objects," who, as Bloomberg puts it, "pop up on the Palantir screen inside boxes connected to other boxes by radiating lines labeled with the relationship: 'Colleague of,' 'Lives with,' 'Operator of [cell number],' 'Owner of [vehicle],' 'Sibling of,' even 'Lover of...'"

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jaimeshade
27 days ago
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Atlanta, GA
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How to permanently delete your Facebook account

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By now, every sane person realizes that Facebook is horrible. It uses your personal data in unsavory ways. It sells your data to unscrupulous companies. It encourages businesses to build their online headquarters on Facebook and then ruins those companies by changing its algorithm. And, maybe worst of all, it has one of the ugliest and most confusing interfaces ever made. I deactivated my account a long time ago, but this week's news about Facebook's relationship with the ultra sleazy data mining firm Cambridge Analytica prompted me to permanently delete my account. Wired has an article that shows you how to do it:

Now, to permanently delete your account, you'll need to learn where the delete option resides. The easiest way to find it is by clicking the "Quick Help" icon in the top-right corner, then the "Search" icon. When you see the search field, type “delete account.” You'll see a list of search results. Click on "How do I permanently delete my account?" and Facebook will give you the obscure instructions to “log into your account and let us know.” In this case, “let us know” is code for “delete my account,” so click on that link. From here, the final steps are clear: Enter your password and solve the security captcha, and your request to permanently delete your account is underway.
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jaimeshade
57 days ago
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I encourage everyone to delete fb if they want to. I did it in December and my life has improved because of it.
Atlanta, GA
rocketo
59 days ago
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I did this late last year and I don’t miss it at all.
seattle, wa
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Stop Twitting Yourself

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Six months ago I quit Twitter. It happened in a moment that combined the deepest loathing (both self- and other-directed) and the brightest clarity, and I have not looked back since. Apart from the actual quitting of Twitter, the thing I am most proud of is not having written an essay about it, so I am not going to make this into a whole narrative, but I have been fairly evangelical with friends (because there is nothing worse than watching the people you love destroy themselves by choice) and I want to share a couple of lessons I’ve learned. I know that many of you will defend your use of Twitter as something you are forced to endure for work (journalists, for example, use Twitter for the invaluable purposes of promoting their stories, showing how connected they are and finding out what other people are saying about them) so let me just tell you up front that if what you do for a living requires you to dip your head into a polluted stream twenty times a day and take a big sip before you personally defecate in the water you either need to find another career or admit to yourself that there is something about you that enjoys drinking from the same river where you shit. The other excuse I’ve heard is that it is important to stay on Twitter to know what is happening in the world, so this is where I want to pass along the valuable knowledge I’ve gained from avoiding it: 1) There is nothing important that happens on Twitter that you will not learn about eventually. 2) There is nothing you will eventually hear about from Twitter that will make you think, “Gosh, I wish I knew that earlier.” You are not missing anything. You do not need to march in the mediocrity parade of frustrated comedians trying to make the same stupid joke a fraction of a second before anyone else. Your image does not need curation, because all you are doing is broadcasting your desperation. No one is cool on Twitter. It is a giant assemblage of sad people trying too hard in real time. You do not need to do anything in front of an audience. Remember email? You probably don’t, because no one uses it anymore, but it was amazing because you could have a conversation with someone without either one of you trying to show off for a pitiable collection of the needy and hopeless, whose craving for validation would be comical if it weren’t as tragic as your own. Your desire to play to the crowd is both symptom and expression of the sickness unto death. All social media is poison, but Twitter is a particular type of toxin because it takes the lack of nuance that makes the Internet in general so abrasive and it dissolves it down to its ugliest essence. Everything that happens on Twitter is a nightmare, and every time you turn away from your screen and wonder why you feel like you want to die that’s why. Stop using Twitter. Here endeth the lesson.

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rocketo
114 days ago
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“if what you do for a living requires you to dip your head into a polluted stream twenty times a day and take a big sip before you personally defecate in the water you either need to find another career or admit to yourself that there is something about you that enjoys drinking from the same river where you shit.”
seattle, wa
jaimeshade
113 days ago
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Atlanta, GA
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2 public comments
lukeburrage
114 days ago
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I love Twitter. Does this author know that you choose who you follow and what you see? Of what you see is toxic, it’s because YOU decided to keep following toxic people. I follow friends, sportspeople, some podcasters, etc... and it’s great! Nothing toxic at all.
rocketo
111 days ago
It must be nice not having anyone target you for harassment on a site you can choose to use. Not everyone on Twitter has the luxury of enjoying it.
lukeburrage
111 days ago
Yes, harassment is a big issue, but that blog post isn't about harassment. It's not even mentioned. It's about self image and following unfunny comedians. The easiest thing: don't post much and only follow friends and small groups. I've blocked Donald Trump too, so he doesn't show up in retweets.
cjmcnamara
114 days ago
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nick carr shot, alex balk chaser
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